October 22nd, 2003

lung

Two dollar bill

You know, until last night, I thought there were no two dollar bills. I mean, I know there used to be two dollar bills, but I had no idea they were still in circulation and still legal tender. Not only are two dollar bills still out there - but they're about to do a new printing, the first since 1996.

http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/18/96
http://money.cnn.com/2003/06/12/pf/banking/new_two_bill/

That's so crazy. I still have trouble believing it. I have never - swear to God, never ever - seen a two dollar bill in my life. Today when I go to the bank to deposit a check, I'm going to hand the teller a withdrawal slip for $10 and ask for five $2 bills. I have to see these things.

Update: I bit the bullet, and went and got change from the bank: one $20 bill (old skool) into 10 crisp '96 and '76 $2 bills. Sigh. My illusions have been torn down. I am... distraught.
  • Current Music: Ben Folds Five - Cigarette
lung

Elliott Smith

Ok I don't know anything about him, in all honesty, other than what I've read recently, but I did notice this little tidbit in the Yahoo! News article about his death:

"He sustained a single stab wound to the chest that appeared to be self-inflicted, she said."


Ok, I'm sorry, but HELLO? How often does anyone stab themselves to death, especially when depressed? In all seriousness, depression robs most people of willpower and motivation, and it strikes me as a method of suicide that would take a whole lot of effort and determination - not to mention strength, if it was a single stab to the chest.

Why is no one asking if this is really a suicide or is in fact a murder? Just because he was depressed and mopey a lot doesn't mean someone couldn't murder him for some reason, and that would explain a knife poking out of him a lot better than suicide would.

"Why are you so sad?" was a question consistently posed to him in interviews, Smith told Salon.com in 2000. To the Nebraska-born musician, what was interpreted as sadness, was really just humanness.

"Just because people have a range of emotions and thoughts...sometimes they get ecstatically happy about something and at other times ridiculously depressed, doesn't mean that there's something wrong with them," Smith told Salon.com in 2000.